top of page
rmkbioliteracies-201-6x9.jpg

UPCOMING EVENTS

New Legacies: One Act Dances

Three Choreographers, Three Composers, Three Writers Create

Friday, March 15, 7:30pm

Saturday, March 16, 7:30pm

Sunday, March 17, 2:00pm 

 

at Presidio Theatre Performing Arts Center
(99 Moraga Avenue, San Francisco)

New Legacies: One Act Dances is the 29th explosive season of Robert Moses’ KIN, the never-predictable San Francisco institution, that continues to push boundaries, create culture, and shape art.

Dancer Z Jackson kneels on the floor looking upwards

“New Legacies: One Act Dances" is an evening of three startlingly original works that offer a defiant response to the chilling effects of censorship. Witness an electrifying triptych forged by three choreographers, three composers, three writers, and 16 dancers along with a provocative new work by Robert Moses. Expect a dynamic mix of dance styles (contemporary to house) and music (acapella to Goth) accompanied by poetry and prose and a stunning visual design. This visceral response to the rising tide of suppression in education and outright censorship challenges us to think about the historical power of narrative erasure. Artistic Director Robert Moses warns, "Libraries crumble and rise again, their contents reshaped to serve the whims of power. This obliteration of stories is the obliteration of lives." Prepare to be moved, dazzled, challenged, and empowered by this potent convergence of art and activism. 

Photo: Z Jackson, by Steve Disenhof

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

If you are interested in helping out at the Home Season in exchange for a comp ticket to the performance, please contact info@robertmoseskin.org

We are seeking extra hands to assist with set up, merchandise sales, and greeting audience members. Volunteers will be asked to arrive 1-1.5 hrs prior to the show and stay about 30 minutes after the performance ends (approx. 4 hours total - 2 hours of volunteer time plus watching the show for free!). Email info@robertmoseskin.org for more information.

Promo

Learn More About The Season

2024 Home Season Behind the Scenes
2024 Season Trailer
00:32
Play Video

2024 Season Trailer

In rehearsal with Natasha Adorlee
00:58
Play Video

In rehearsal with Natasha Adorlee

In Rehearsal with Robert Moses
00:37
Play Video

In Rehearsal with Robert Moses

Conversations between Iva & Vincent
00:44
Play Video

Conversations between Iva & Vincent

Collabortor

ABOUT THE GUEST CHOREOGRAPHERS

Natasha Adorlee Johnson, photo by Robert Suguitan

Natasha Adorlee is an Emmy Award-winning choreographer, filmmaker, composer, and educator based in San Francisco, CA. A first-generation Asian American woman, she is currently the Artistic Fellow with Amy Sewiert's Imagery. Adorlee began choreographing in 2014 while maintaining a dance career with Robert Moses' KIN, ODC/Dance, Kate Weare and Co., and the San Francisco Symphony. Since winning over ten international awards for her acclaimed short film Take Your Time in 2018, she has been a much sought-after filmmaker, choreographer, and composer.

 

After attending SUNY Purchase and graduating from UC Berkeley, Adorlee joined ODC/Dance. As a performer, she has danced a vast repertoire of works and contributed original choreography, sound design, and art direction to over 20+ ODC/Dance repertory works. In addition, she has created over 20 original dance-based works- spanning stage, film, and immersive performance mediums. Most recently, she was commissioned to create for Joffrey Ballet's Winning Works, Ceprodac (Mexico), Kawaguchi Ballet (Japan), Ballare Carmel, Ballet22, and Imagery. In addition to working for dance companies, Adorlee has created original work for Pixar Animation Studios, Occulus, National Geographic, and New Yorker Magazine. She founded Concept o4 to create multimedia dance-based experiences advocating for more accessibility to the arts. Awarded an NEA Grant, Dresher Fellowship, and Jacob's Pillow Choreographic Fellowship in 2023 and a BalletX and Kansas City Ballet commission in 2024, Adorlee is pursuing a prolific creation period while sharing her deep knowledge of movement and film with the greater community through Dance on Camera workshops. She is also an Artistic Advisor for Ballet22.

Khala Brannigan, photo by Edon Gottlieb

Since relocating to New York from the Bay Area in 2019, Khala Brannigan participated in a choreographic fellowship with Sidra Bell Dance, guested with Soluq Dance Theater, and presented work at Peridance Capezio Center, Three’s Brewing, Arts on Site, and in September 2021, an evening length work at The Woods Performance Space. She also presented work at Arts On Site October as a part of Dual Rivet's Made By Women Festival. Since choreographing for the short film directed by Katherine Huggard titled Amor Fati, she has been working towards another evening length piece titled Blood & Innocence. Originally from Santa Fe, NM, Brannigan began her dance training at age seven. After high school, she attended the Alonzo King LINES Ballet Training Program in San Francisco, CA after which she was selected as a resident choreographer with SAFEHouse Arts for the next six years.

 

Brannigan became a certified GYROTONIC® instructor in 2013, and her first 200 Hour Yoga Teacher Training took place in Rishikesh, India, with World Peace Yoga School in 2015. Throughout her time in San Francisco, Brannigan received awards from Zellerbach Family Foundation, Dancers’ Group CA$H Grant and presented full evening works at large scale venues such as ODC Theater, Joe Goode Annex, and Z Space. Her work has been presented in multiple local festivals including SF Dance Film Festival and Summer Performance Festival. Brannigan was a company member with Robert Moses’ KIN from 2017-2019.  She currently teaches for Dancewave’s community programs, is a certified GYROTONIC® instructor at Movement Beyond in Soho, and also teaches yoga at Kula Yoga Project, YO-BK, and Yoga Space NYC.  Instagram: @khalabrannigan  Website: khalabrannigan.com

Robert Kelley, photo by Amanda Van Meter Burch

Improvisational dance performer and choreographer, Robert S. Kelley II, a Florida native He has presented his choreography at Centre National de la Danse, The Barnsdall Gallery Theatre, California Institute of The Arts, Hillsborough Community College, Valencia College, Alvin Ailey  Citigroup Theatre, St. Petersburg College, Dance Truck, The Music Box and The University of  South Florida. Kelly’s most recent work was The Paradox of Lament, a collaboration that premiered at California Institute of The Arts 50th anniversary.  He is an Ann & Weston Hicks Choreography Fellow from the School at Jacob’s Pillow and currently teaches contemporary, improvisation and body conditioning at Ballet Kukan Academy in Monrovia, CA.

 

What compels him to choreograph has always been building shapes with the body without regard towards aesthetic, blending explicit and implicit movement to create dance that has its own balance of freedom and form that test the boundaries of the Amateur/Virtuosic spectrum. Also drawn to making content that relates to the nine primary emotions, he specifically focuses on fear, anger,  trust, and love because he feels these states remind us of our fragility.  He earned his Associate’s degree in Dance Performance from Valencia College, a Bachelor of Fine Arts with a concentration in Modern Dance from the University of South Florida, and a Master of Fine Arts in Choreography from the California Institute of the Arts.

ABOUT THE GUEST Composers

Headshot of Bryan Dryer

Bryan Dyer is a musician with more than 30 years of professional experience. He’s a versatile multi-instrumentalist, vocalist, and producer who performs many styles of music, from classical and avant-garde to rock, jazz, and blues. Music has taken Bryan around the world to perform in countries including Japan, Switzerland, Indonesia, and Africa, and alongside such notable artists as Huey Lewis and The News, Michael McDonald, and Carlos Santana. Some of the groups he currently performs with include SoVoSo, The Funk Revival Orchestra, Chelle! and Friends, Bobby McFerrin & MOTION, Crosspulse w/Keith Terry, and Linda Tillery, and the Cultural Heritage Choir. Bryan has also worked on several projects with Santa Cruz-based producer and choreographer over the last 20 years including “JOY” and “Mixed Nutz!”.

Headshot of B Dukes

Inspired by the voices of the ancestors and plant medicines — big ma’s baby —  B Dukes (they/them) is a Leesville, South Carolina-raised multi-hyphenate artist who approaches their work with the transformational healing of their Black, Brown, and Indigenous queer kin in mind. Embracing the sacred art of playing with nature, inquiry, pleasure, and rest, they are currently exploring birthing sacred spaces and visual art that liberates and heals through improvisation, soundscapes, plants, movement, and visual art.

Headshot of Vicki Randle

Vicki Randle was born into a musical family, her father a jazz pianist and her brother a world renowned opera singer. A guitarist, bassist, percussionist, composer, and singer, she has a 50-year-long career recording, touring, and composing in multiple genres: folk, jazz, rock, pop, and others. She has toured with Narada Michael Walden, Laura Nyro, George Benson, Lionel Richie, Wayne Shorter, and Kenny Loggins. She recorded with Aretha Franklin, Herbie Hancock, Todd Rundgren, Branford Marsalis. She was a percussionist and singer in the Tonight Show with Jay Leno band from 1992 to 2010.  She toured with Mavis Staples for 8 years, appearing on 3 records, and her HBO documentary “Mavis!” Her rock and funk band “Skip The Needle” released their 3rd album on Little Village records and she most recently recorded and toured as a member of the iconic rock quintet MC5. Vickirandle.com

ABOUT THE GUEST Playwrights

Headshot of Anne Galjour

Anne Galjour came to San Francisco in 1980 to check out the theatre scene and stayed.  She became a solo performer and playwright whose Cajun inspired works have been produced by theatres, colleges and theatre festivals around the country. New Legacies is her third collaboration with Robert Moses Kin. She is a lecturer in the Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University.   Sincere thanks from the depths to Robert, the choreographers, the dancers, and the staff at RMK.

Headshot of PC Muñoz

PC Muñoz is a CHamoru musician, writer, composer, and frequent collaborator with Robert Moses’ Kin. His body of recorded work as an artist and producer includes GRAMMY®-nominated contemporary classical music with composer/cellist Joan Jeanrenaud as well as projects with rock legend Jackson Browne, Chicana poet/chanteuse Ingrid Chavez, multireed sorcerer David Boyce, and more. He is a current Mosaic America Fellow and a featured writer in the award-winning 2022 collection from University of Hawai’i Press, Indigenous Pacific Islander Eco-literatures. Visit: pcmunoz.com and redfastluck.com

Headshot of Julius Rea

Julius Ernesto Rea (he/they) is a Bay Area writer and arts producer. They co-founded The Forum Collective as well as Substrate Arts, a local longform arts journal. They are currently the playwright for "The Day the Sky Turned Orange" at SFBATCO, supported by the YBCA Creative Corps Initiative. In addition to their work as a playwright, they work with Lorraine Hansberry Theatre as a production manager.

Activities of Robert Moses’ Kin have been made possible by: The Dream Keeper Initiative/Human Rights Commission, The International Association of Blacks in Dance, Grants for the Arts, The Kenneth Rainin Foundation, National Dance Project/NEFA, Fleishhacker Foundation, Zellerbach Family Foundation, and generous individuals.

The Bootstraps program is funded by the "Storytelling and Narrative Shift for the Black Community in San Francisco" grant through the Human Rights Commission's new Dream Keeper Initiative (DKI) and the California Arts Council.

“Robert Moses, with his dance company, Kin, not only creates some of the most gorgeous movement on stage anywhere, but also is committed to tackling ideas of race, class, culture and gender, and he does so successfully." 

— San Francisco Chronicle

“The movement is extremely stretched out and jazzy, and underscores Moses’ expansive use of space, which in this case makes us feel there are far more than six dancers on stage.”

Seattle Times

bottom of page